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Project Finance vs. Corporate Finance: Careers, Recruiting, Financial Modeling, and More

Brian DeChesare

With the craze over renewable energy and infrastructure over the past few years, we’ve received more and more questions about Project Finance vs. Corporate Finance. And yes, coincidentally, we have a new Project Finance & Infrastructure Modeling course. social infrastructure (hospitals, schools, etc.),

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META Lesson 2: Accounting Inconsistencies and Consequences

Musings on Markets

Accounting 101 I am not an accountant, and have no desire to be one, but I have used their output (accounting statements) as raw material in valuation and corporate finance. Capital expenses are expenses that provide benefits over many years. For a manufacturing company, these can take the form of plant and equipment.

Finance 74
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Weighted Average Cost of Capital Explained – Formula and Meaning

Valutico

Determining a company’s “Cost of Capital” is vital in corporate finance and valuation, and the Weighted Average Cost of Capital (WACC) provides a specific way of doing so. What is the Weighted Average Cost of Capital (WACC)?

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Weighted Average Cost of Capital Explained – Formula and Meaning

Valutico

Determining a company’s “Cost of Capital” is vital in corporate finance and valuation, and the Weighted Average Cost of Capital (WACC) provides a specific way of doing so. What is the Weighted Average Cost of Capital (WACC)?

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Weighted Average Cost of Capital Explained – Formula and Meaning

Valutico

Determining a company’s “Cost of Capital” is vital in corporate finance and valuation, and the Weighted Average Cost of Capital (WACC) provides a specific way of doing so. What is the Weighted Average Cost of Capital (WACC)?

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Modeling Managers as EPS Maximizers

Reynolds Holding

We propose a theory of corporate finance based on the idea that firm managers maximize EPS: the difference between net operating profits and interest expense divided by total shares outstanding. We can broadly classify firms’ corporate behaviors into two categories: growth and value firms. Corporate finance.

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Oil & Gas Investment Banking: The First Victim of the ESG Cult?

Brian DeChesare

Oil & gas is very dependent on debt and equity financing, so the bulge brackets have a distinct advantage over smaller/independent firms here. If you want to stay in energy, pretty much anything is open to you: private equity, hedge funds, corporate development, corporate finance, etc.

Banking 91